Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Capgras Delusion and Alzheimer’s Disease - Alzheimer’s 15

Illustration of Capgras delusion
(Photo Credit: Ecureddotcu)

She was about eighties. A wife of a veteran.

Indeed, we just commemorated Veteran Day yesterday. The deep thought for all of our veterans, hoping they have meaningful day.

About the lady, I have never ever forgotten how depress she was.

She sat in her chair next to her husband when we had a casual conversation. She slowly got up from her chair. She walked down the hall in to her bedroom. Perhaps she would like to use bathroom or just fix her hair.

She did not came back yet and we were about to leave. So, we looked into her room and she seemed made the bed. She tried to fix her tidy bed stared at the bed and she said, “This bed, look at this bed, we had a lot memories here.”

She sobbed, “We shared our life here, but I have never know where is he now.”

She sobbed, her shoulder up and down, her face looked very desperate. Then she walked to the door, stared outside through the glass window, “I don't know how is he now.”

Her daughter took her back to her chair next to her husband. She still sobbed.



Capgras delusion is identical-looking imposter (Roses for illustration).

Her daughter said that she thought her husband who sit next her was somebody else pretending her husband. He looks like her husband but he is not her husband. Everyday and every night, she looks for him and wait for him desperately.

Her thought about her husband is a delusion. The man sit next to her was her husband.

This delusion is called Capgras delusion or imposter delusion.

The phenomena was described by Jean-Marie Joseph Cargas and his intern Jean Reboul-Lachaux (1923) from the case of 53 year-old woman who believed about the tragedies in her life.

Her first child was abducted and replaced by another baby, and tragically died. The the twin girls were born, one grown and another was abducted, the same case with the first baby, replaced with another baby and died.

Then, the twin boys were born, the same case happened for both boy, abducted, replaced  and finally died.

She also believed that her husband also replaced by another person, Then, she saw the police and all of her neighbors were abducted and replaced by identical-looking imposter.

They were just her delusion. Four of her children died when they were infant. Neither abducted nor imposter.


For Alzheimer’s disease, the phenomenon of Capgras delusion sometimes presumed as miss-identification or cognitive failure. 

60 comments:

  1. The first photo gives me headache LOL
    A sad story :-(( poor lady..

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  2. The pain between illusion and confusion. Not knowing, not perceiving, not identifying, not recognizing or recognizing oneself are also aspects of the pain of being someone who is leaving himself ...

    Touching entry, Evi, in this sobering Alzheimer's series.

    Hugs bigger and bigger.

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  3. Oh that sounds terrible dear Evi !

    i feel for her pain ,i was completely unaware that if there exist such disease in reality
    this is how our brain paint our desires right before us sometimes
    thank you for sensitive sharing my friend

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  4. Oh Evi this made me cry ,how sad. What a horrible desease xx

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  5. Una enfermedad que vivo de cerca con un familiar. Saludos amiga.

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  6. È una malattia tremenda che fa soffrire tantissimo tutta la famiglia, oltre che l’ammalato. Terribile. Ciao Evi, buona giornata.
    sinforosa

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  7. That was a very sad story, Evi!
    This disease is terrible!

    Hugs!

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  8. Mi sono venuti i brividi... quanta tristezza :-(

    https://nettaredimiele.blogspot.com

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  9. It is scary and sad, I would not wish it to anyone...

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  10. Olá Evi
    Doença horrível. Bjs querida e um ótimo dia.

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  11. OMG!
    Very very very interesting post
    Thanks for sharing
    Xoxo ♡

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  12. This is so sad, Evi. I don't know a lot about this disease, but now, with your post I can have a little knowledge about it.
    Hugs,
    Marisa.

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  13. Interesting post my dear, thank you for sharing.

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  14. Todo es triste en esta enfermedad Evi. Da pena ver a tus seres queridos que no te reconozcan.
    Un abrazo.

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  15. alangkah menyedihkannya bagaimana ya kalau sampai kita melupakan orang yang paling kita sayangi

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  16. Agradecido por el buen concepto que tiene de mis fotos.

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  17. have a good day! I send you a smile:)

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  18. So horrible and sad if one has this disease.
    xx from Bavaria/Germany, Rena
    www.dressedwithsoul.com

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  19. This is a very sad story.
    Have a nice day.

    galerafashion.com

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  20. So sad and terrible story... makes me goosebumps.
    And the worst part is that you cannot even help someway those poor people.
    XO
    S
    https://s-fashion-avenue.blogspot.com

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  21. To bardzo smutna historia. Nie słyszałam o takim efekcie, bardzo dziwna reakcja. Aż trudno uwierzyć jak choroba potrafi zmienić człowieka. Cieplutko pozdrawiam.

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  22. Such a sad story.

    New Post - http://www.exclusivebeautydiary.com/2019/11/declare-caviar-perfection-luxury-anti_14.html

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  23. Todo es estupendo ! El post genial! Buenas noches! 🧡🧡🧡

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  24. Triste es la historia que nos cuenta.

    Besos

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  25. It is a complicated and sad disease;
    continuation of a good week.

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  26. Kasian juga yah mba kalo sampe hidup dalam ilusinya.

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  27. ¡Hola!
    Que bonito y que triste a la vez. Esta enfermedad que poco a poco nos consigue llevar a nuestra niñez de una forma no natural.
    B7s

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  28. ¡Qué triste!
    Es una enfermedad que nos anula por completo y, en ese caso, también altera la realidad.
    Agradezco tu visita.
    Cariños.
    Kasioles

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  29. I was unaware of this neuropsychiatric disorder, that is, Capgras Syndrome, of which you make a wonderful contribution with very good examples.
    It is unfortunate to what extent the human mind can degrade and produce so much suffering to the sufferer and their family environment.
    I congratulate you for your great work, Evi, helping these patients.
    Have a wonderful day!

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  30. Sedih banget kalau ada anggota keluarga kita yg kena sakit sperti ini, gak bisa bayangin :(

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  31. A touching post.
    Unfortunately I know Alzheimer's disease very well because my father had it.
    He never failed to reconized my mother and me, but all the other friends and family were no longer present in his memory.
    It is a particularly difficult disease for family members, as those who have it gradually cease to realize their situation. It's so sad.
    A big hug
    Maria

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  32. It's a terrible disease .. and sad story.

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  33. So Sad story!!
    Hope no one in my family has it!!
    xoox

    marisasclosetblog.com

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  34. Recuerdos,tristezas y melancolías

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  35. very unpleasant disease
    best regards
    Lili

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  36. How sad, that story about the lady who lost so many children :(

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  37. Ohhh so sad when the memory goes away.

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  38. Oh my! What a very sad disease.

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